The Hidden Treasures of Rimini

In Italy, Emilia-Romagna, the birthplace of ragu, prosciutto di Parma, balsamic vinegar and Parmesan cheese, came in at number one on Lonely Planet’s Best in Europe 2018 list. And Rimini, which made the New York Times list of must-see places this year, sits right in the middle of it. It might be high time you consider it for your next event.

Internationally renowned food, the best-preserved roman, medieval and Renaissance architecture, and internationally worshipped sports cars are just some of the reasons that makes the Emilia-Romagna regionone of the top 2018 European destinations according to Lonely Planet.

If some of you may know Rimini as a great place for lazing on the beach and living the night life, it certainly has a lot to offer when it comes to conferences. A successful and innovative business destination, it boasts one of the most advanced – and iconic-looking – congress centres in Italy. Managed by Convention Bureau della Riviera di Rimini, the Palacongressi di Rimini offers a flexible space and hosts events of any size and format, from business conventions to medical-scientific symposiums, from cultural gatherings to association meetings. The Palacongressi features 39 rooms that have a total capacity of 9,000 people, a plenary hall of 4,700 seats and 11,000 sqm for exhibition.

Of course, there’s plenty to do and see after a hard day’s work at the Palacongressi. From historical villas and castles to medieval villages; from the numerous hotels to theme parks; from beaches to trendy bars, the Riviera di Rimini provides a special atmosphere that will give yet another dimension to your event.

And if you’re after finding what you can do in Rimini and Rimini only, there are a few options. A visit to the Surgeon’s House, where the oldest set of Roman surgical instruments was once found, will reveal a host of unexpected treasures. A stroll along the 200-meter pier at the port while the sun is setting will ease your mind. You can also enjoy Rimini’s state-of-the-art marina with over 600 berths. And there is of course the Grand Hotel, where Art Nouveau charm and the memory of Federico Fellini, the world-renowned film director who was born in Rimini – and the inventor of the Dolce Vita – linger in the air…

Last but not least, at just 20 kilometers inland from Rimini and 760 meters above sea level lies San Marino, the smallest and oldest republic in Europe. Founded in the IV century, it became a UNESCO heritage site in 2008 as «a testimony to the continuity of a free republic since the Middle Ages». Definitely a place to see.

This article was powered by Convention Bureau della Riviera di Rimini. For more information:www.riminiconvention.it/ delaubert@riminiconvention.it

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