Supportive Care in Cancer in Adelaide

July 10, 2018

Supportive Care in Cancer in Adelaide

A few years ago, Adelaide may have seemed like another Australian city with no clear-cut identity, but it has since transformed itself into a destination attracting attention from associations all over the globe. It helps, of course, that urban revitalization projects are everywhere to be seen, with some exciting architectural rejuvenation among the city’s art venues, museums, and downtown residential and office buildings. This attention also stems from another source: the city’s ambition to being a medical and life science leader on the world stage.

The 2016 MASCC/ISOO Annual Meeting on Supportive Care in Cancer was held at Adelaide Convention Centre in June 2016. According to MASCC President Ian Olver “innovation was a particular aim of the meeting,” which attracted over 1,070 delegates from more than 50 countries, with a sizable turnout from Australia and Asia. At the time, MASCC had traditionally met either in North America or Europe, but momentum had been building to host the MASCC symposium in Australia for several years, and there was a growing desire to be more global, since the forum gathers world-leading experts to discuss the latest scientific developments and cutting-edge research in supportive care in cancer.

Adelaide was selected based on a number of criteria. Scientific Program Co-Chair Dorothy Keefe explains: “Supportive care is ultimately about improvements in care, management of the side effects of cancer treatment–both physical and psychological—prevention of secondary cancer, prolong survivorship, and maximization of quality of life. The work we are undertaking at Adelaide’s BioMed City and in our universities within this field are ground-breaking and gaining worldwide recognition; it just made sense to hold the meeting in the South Australian capital. At the time it took place, the city had also just completed its new Riverbank precinct with a new hospital, research institute, convention centre and university buildings. The revamped infrastructure and easiness of use was impressive.”

According to Dorothy, Adelaide is a perfectly sized city for a conference, since it is compact, close to the airport, and offers hotels and facilities within walking distance. Now that the Royal Adelaide Hospital and medical school are open, it will be even better. The hotels are also very good, and the choice of restaurants is fantastic—the best sitting within a stone’s throw from the Centre. Safety is also increasingly important, and Adelaide is one of the safest cities. And, of course, we boast such wonderful wineries and natural beauty within a very short travel distance,she adds.

The Symposium definitely enhanced Adelaide’s reputation as a wonderful conference destination, as well as an emerging arts venue (a much-appreciated art exhibition was held during the conference) and place where patients are at the heart of supportive care in cancer. The legacy components of the meeting were threefold. We were able to engage the Asia-Pacific region like never before and increased the presence of MASCC and its membership in the region. South Australia became better known to the participants as a wonderful destination. We had many visitors from the USA, Europe, and Asia, and a large number of them would have known of Melbourne or Sydney before but were delighted with Adelaide. The focus on the region also led to an increase in the knowledge of supportive care and long-term patient benefits. It showed how well the city works for visitors and for conferences. It also changed MASCC; there had never been dancing at a MASCC President’s dinner before!” Dorothy said.

This article was written by Boardroom Chief Editor Rémi Dévé (editor@boardroom.global). The full version of this article can be read in the latest issue of Boardroom available here.

June 29, 2018

Sapporo
– Into the Wild

The capital of the northern island and prefecture of Hokkaido and the fifth-largest city in Japan, Sapporo gained international prominence when it was chosen as the host to the Winter Olympic Games in 1972. Since then, it has gone from strength to strength, and not only in the sports field or because of its breweries. When it comes to association congresses indeed, Sapporo has many assets up its sleeves, starting with a wealth of knowledge in many areas of endeavours, as well as all the facilities you can expect in a fast-growing environment.

Knowledge Hub

With academic institutions of global fame leading in the fields of geosciences, organic chemistry, agriculture, forestry, energy, medicine, pharma, animal behavior and veterinary sciences, Sapporo’s unique and rich natural environment has a lot to offer when it comes to the value of a meeting.

Hokkaido University, for instance, is one of the top universities in Japan that conducts world-leading education and research. Found in 1876 as Sapporo Agricultural College, it now consists of 12 Undergraduate Programs, 21 Graduate Schools, 4 Research Institutes, 3 Research Centers, 10 Joint Research Centers, and a University Hospital with Medical and Dental Departments.

Among the university’s awards and achievements is the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, won by Professor Emeritus Akira Suzuki in 2010. One of the university’s recent projects is the Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), a faculty organisation that brings together world-class teaching staff from around the world. The program’s aim is to promote international collaborative research and education that leverages the University’s strengths and distinctive features, and to provide support for international collaborative research.

Collaboration is key

This drive for collaboration was particularly obvious when Sapporo Convention Center hosted the 5thInternational Wildlife Management Congress in July 2015, which brought together 1,400 participants from 46 countries and regions. Initiated by the Mammal Society of Japan (MSJ) in partnership with the Wildlife Society (TWS), the goal of the Congress was to enhance global sustainability and the conservation of wildlife, as well as to recommend improved international models based on the latest interdisciplinary wildlife research. Due to its unique natural environment, Sapporo has, for many years indeed, been introducing many exemplary practices in wildlife management and human dimension studies.

The legacy component of the Congress was impressive. If delegates and citizens joined forces for a good cause, clearing out and cutting down thickets and tall grass along Toyohira River, Rakuno Gakuen University and Sapporo City Government signed, on the occasion of the conference, an Agreement on Policy Proposals on Biodiversity. Thanks to this, research activities on alien species countermeasures and wildlife management discussed at the event are still continuing to this day.

The Congress also provided an important opportunity to discuss and come up with solutions for some of the serious wildlife-related issues that Sapporo was facing, such as the increasing appearance of brown bears and dears in urban areas. An open symposium on the topic was held for the public, which helped to increase the awareness of the issue, the city’s ecosystem and the importance of the wildlife preservation among the citizens. The younger generation was not left out either, as a special symposium on wildlife management and preservation was organised for junior-high and high school students from all parts of Japan during the conference.

This article was written by Boardroom Chief Editor Remi Deve (editor@boardroom.global)

June 21, 2018

Business Events:
The Power of Associations

In the second of three insights on the value of business and professional events, GainingEdge CEO Gary Grimmer and Gregg Talley, President and CEO of the Talley Management Group, analyse the crucial role professional associations and the broader “civil society” deliver across all the whole of scientific and industrial development.

“Civil society organisations do work that government can’t necessarily do and do work that business can’t necessarily do. Yet if we can create a space where we actually pull together the professionals in a given field, and then invite business to the table, invite government to the table, invite your stakeholders to the table, we have much richer conversation” says Talley.

Watch the video on the website of Boardroom’s partner The Iceberg.

June 13, 2018

Consider Your Impact at Every Stage of Event Planning

Events have the potential to provide a lasting impact for the organisations that plan and own them, the participants who attend them, and the communities that host them. This potential is realised when events are intentionally designed to drive business value, to enhance the participant experience, and to engage the community economically, socially, and environmentally. A focus on this “legacy” helps us to make sure this impact is a responsible one.

In an interesting piece from Boardroom’s partner, PCMA, Karen Kotowski, CAE, CMP, CEO of the Events Industry Council, says there is a growing awareness about the effect events have on communities.

You can read all about it here.

June 6, 2018

GainingEdge’s Educating Early Meeting on Legacy during IMEX

On the last day of IMEX in Frankfurt, GainingEdge organised an early meeting on the premises aiming to educate its attendees further on the important topic of ‘Legacy’. In this framework, three speakers were invited to present their views and stories around the issue at hand. We, at Boardroom, hold Legacy in our heart, it’s a topic we deal with on a regular base with a special section on our website and once a year in print; so we were also there to hear all the experts had to say.

Representing Rehabilitation International World Congress, Venus Ilagan emphasised the need for the empowerment and inclusion of people with disabilities, which was also the congress’s main theme. Held in Edinburgh in 2016, the challenge was to prepare the city for the hundreds of attendees with disabilities. RI’s vision is to ensure that when it holds its world congresses, it should leave a legacy behind; this time, in close collaboration with Convention Edinburgh, it went far beyond having an economic impact and a global prestige for the city, it fundamentally changed Edinburgh’s and Scotland’s approach to accessibility and inclusion and in shaping a better future for all. As a legacy from the RI World Congress, there has been a destination-wide working group that was created, focusing on accessible and inclusive tourism, called Everyone’s Edinburgh.

The second story shared in the room came from Colombia and Linda Garzón, who explained how the vision of leaving a legacy should start already from the bidding process. In Bogotá’s case, bidding for One Young World Summit (OYW) engaged young citizens to participate in different movements around the world; they are now measuring the impact of the projects regarding their contribution to the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals. In the same way, the World Summit of Nobel Peace Laureates raised the level of dialogue around peace and contributed to the peace building process of the country by live streaming the event in seven countries and involving the vulnerable population affected by conflicts. You can read all about Bogotá and its legacy on our website.

Finally, Genevieve Leclerc, founder of Caravelle Strategies, described how convention bureaux can add value to their association clients and emphasized the difference between legacy versus impact. She explained how legacy is something left or handed down by a predecessor; a notion hard to measure, it implies changing the lives of the attendees and the community, but it might not be what an association set out to do in the first place. On the other hand, impact makes a significant change by addressing an existing challenge, social, economic or other type. It is durable and deliberate.

Written by Boardroom’s digital editor Vicky Koffa

 

May 31, 2018

Copenhagen Wanders Beyond Legacy

During IMEX, Copenhagen presented us with the interesting notion of the image problem academic events are facing; the endless conference invitations and the talk around carbon footprint paired with the strained budgets at public research institutions result in the loss of academics as key meeting attendees. The meeting industry should be able to document value creation, to make an impact, and in Copenhagen they are trying to do just that; help academics evaluate their events.

The campaign for legacy is meant to highlight how the meeting industry contributes to a better world, however, according to Industrial PhD student, Thomas Trøst Hansen, this concept is not clear and the real challenge lies in developing evaluations of the existing value creation at academic events, e.g. inspiration, network development, community building and exchange of recognition. These are the reasons for having academic events and we have failed to demonstrate their importance.

Always according to Mr Hansen’s research, academics work and receive recognition through a value chain which is used as a basis for evaluating academic events. He has found remarkable differences in the outcomes between different types of events, including congresses, specialty conferences, symposia and practitioners’ meetings. By focusing on the academic sector and addressing the academic outcomes, the evaluation framework will be more engaging for the academic sector, including universities, funding bodies and scientific associations. The involvement of such actors in the evaluations of their own events is key to promoting the broader outcomes of the meetings industry.

 

May 22, 2018

Malaysia Leads Legacy Efforts in Southeast Asia

Malaysia Convention & Exhibition Bureau (MyCEB) has rolled out several programmes and initiatives to spur legacy planning among its local associations that will be hosting international conferences this year and beyond. With a focus on six main pillars, namely knowledge sharing, networking, educational outcomes, fundraising and future research capacity, raising awareness and profiling, and showcasing and destination reputation, MyCEB has commissioned the development of case studies with high-impact legacies to accentuate the importance and the benefits beyond tourism of hosting meetings and conferences in Malaysia to the country.

Ho Yoke Ping, General Manager, Business Events, MyCEB, explains: “We have identified several high-profile business events like the 25hWorld Gas Conference 2014, the ICCA World Congress 2016, and the recently held 9thWorld Urban Forum 2018, as well as upcoming conferences such as the World Chefs Congress and Expo 2018, the IFLA World Library and Information Congress 2018, the World Cancer Congress 2018 and the International Solid Waste Association World Congress 2018. We will be disseminating these case studies to all our stakeholders for them to better understand that these events are more than just number of delegates and hotel rooms, but also touch the lives of the professional and local communities in Malaysia.”

Following earlier efforts like the formation of Malaysian Society of Association Executives (MSAE) in 2017, as well as the Kesatria programme, also known as the conference ambassador programme, MyCEB also conducted a legacy clinic in March 2018, with the objective to explore and measure the beyond tourism benefits in Malaysia from the perspective of event organisers, employers, delegates, exhibitors and sponsors. A total of 12 associations attended the clinic, which is the first in a series of more clinics in the future. Part of this overall initiative is also pushing the government by strengthening multi-sectorial and inter-ministerial cooperation with the appointment of one focal point contact from all ministries.

May 11, 2018

Cape Town Turns
Water Crisis Into Legacy

Cape Town is fighting the worst drought in recorded history, but leveraged the opportunity to position itself as a leader in innovation and resilience in the field of water management to attract new conferences.

Cape Town’s worst drought in recorded history was feared to spell disaster for the city’s tourism economy as photos of water lines and doomsday headlines started appearing on news broadcasts around the world.

As the top ranked city in Africa for business tourism events by the International Congress and Convention Association, Cape Town relies on conferences not only for the visitor boost but to attract investors. Rather than scare conferences away, however, the crisis became an opportunity to become a knowledge leader and global champion in an under-recognized but growing field.

In addition to the Young Water Professionals Conference held in December 2017, Cape Town will host three water-related conferences in 2018 including the International Water Association’s 2018 Water Loss Conference held in early May. It was the first IWA conference to be held in Africa and seen as an opportunity to highlight best practices from across the continent.

“One of the criteria for selection is how appealing and relevant a destination is for water professionals from a professional development and learning perspective,” explains Kirsten de Vette, Learning and Capacity Development officer, IWA World Water Congress & Exhibition. “In Cape Town’s case, the drought provided attendees an opportunity to learn first hand about the response of the city to such a severe crisis.” 

Proactive Approach

The Cape Town International Convention Centre proactively prepared for the worsening drought conditions, reducing its annual water consumption by 8 million liters over the last 6 years, and recording a 42-percent savings in water consumption between the first quarter of 2017 and 2018.  CTICC chief executive Julie-May Ellingson wrote all clients in early 2018 alerting them of the center’s efforts to reduce water usage and the learning opportunity at hand.

Water professionals are aligning themselves with Cape Town to spark further opportunities for the sector as a whole.

“Cape Town’s drought crisis has provided an opportunity to elevate the relevance and importance of an event such as the WISA biennial conference, given the organization is the largest professional membership body for representatives within the water sector”, explains Jason Mingo, Chief Scientific committee member at Water Institute of Southern Africa.

WISA has been instrumental in driving the International Water Association – Water Loss Conference 2018 and their own Biennial Conference and Exhibition 2018 to Cape Town. The biennial event aims to be water neutral, offsetting the water footprint of almost 1,000 expected delegates. 

“‘Never waste a good crisis’, remains an apt motto within the water sector,” says Mingo.

Building a Legacy

Information sharing is at the crux of Cape Town’s growing knowledge hub, explains Corne Koch, Head of the Cape Town and Western Cape Convention Bureau, who takes a holistic approach to hub building.

“Even before the water crisis became a huge challenge, conferences identified opportunities to build a legacy in the destination. The bureau drives discussion about knowledge sharing and building legacy with conference planners,” said Koch. “Conferences promote and support other business sectors, providing direct and indirect opportunities, to spread knowledge. This creates additional opportunities to attract other meetings and conferences.”

The water adjacent International Conference on Sanitation,Waste and Water will be hosted in Cape Town in November, and is not likely to be the last of Cape Town’s growing water-related lineup.

This article was written by Boardroom editor, Samantha Shankman (samantha@boardroom.global).

May 7, 2018

International Research Conferences: The Academic Impact

The study explores the benefits and barriers for individual researchers and universities when hosting research conferences. It has been commissioned by the Danish Council for Research and Innovation Policy – an advisory body to the Danish Minister of Higher Education and Science, and situates the hosting of research conferences as a potential tool for enhancing the national science system.

The study concludes that the individual researchers benefit mainly in terms of increased visibility and networking. The host institution and wider research environment benefit by easier access to recruitment, involvement of PhD students and younger researchers, as well as increased visibility. There are a number of barriers related to hosting international conferences of which the most prominent are lack of time and resources.

From Boardroom’s partner, The Iceberg.

April 26, 2018

Leaving a Space Legacy in Jerusalem

In the Old City of Jerusalem, there’s a saying that each stone holds a piece of history. Perhaps that’s because the city has a history spanning back thousands of years, from the time of the Judean kings and the Roman Empire through to the Islamic period and modern State of Israel. But while Jerusalem’s past is one draw, the city is looking to its dynamic institutions and research centres to build its future. Highly esteemed conferences in sectors like space are leaving a legacy that extend far beyond Jerusalem’s famed Western Wall, impacting the city and influencing others around the globe with groundbreaking new developments. 

Strengthening Space Ties

Sitting at the centre of the world, connecting the East and West and making it an easy destination for delegates to descend upon, Jerusalem has earned a reputation of being a place worth visiting for more than its holy history. But looking beyond and to the future, the city is also seen as one of the top emerging technological hubs, while Israel as a whole has rightfully earned the nickname The Startup Nation since it boasts the largest number of per-capita startups and venture capital investments in the world.

Not only is Jerusalem buzzing in terms of business, the city is also home to one of the top academic institutions, The Hebrew University, which ranks among the 100 most outstanding in the world. Along with its affiliate Hadassah Medical Center, the university conducts over one-third of Israel’s academic research and 43% of the country’s biotechnology research. The city acts as an academic powerhouse and leader in life sciences, with revolutionary research in the realm of regenerative medicine and stem cell experimentation, drawing the likes of scientists and physicians from around the country—and world—to showcase their findings in the same fields.

But one sector that’s really gaining momentum is space, with a legacy that can still be felt after the 66thannual International Astronautical Congress (IAC)—the world’s leadingspace conference—was held in Jerusalem in 2015.

IAC 2015

Hosted by the Israel Space Agency at the Jerusalem Israel Convention Center (ICC), the IAC brought together over 2,000 participants from 60 different countries, with more than 100 exhibitions and presenters, including American aerospace and defence company Lockheed Martin; the Italian Space Agency; the South African National Space Agency; Korea Aerospace Research Institute; the Romanian Space Agency; Israel Aerospace Industries;and the UK Space Agency. “This annual event serves as a backdrop for the global space sector allowing governmental, academia and private industry leaders to envision, implement and complete collaborative projects for the betterment of science and humanity,” explained former Minister of Science, Technology and Space Danny Danon.

The International Astronautical Federation (IAF) has a history stemming back more than 60 years, before the first satellite was even sent into space, and the IAC is its largest annual conference. In similar style to the Olympic Games, the federation, which includes founding members like France’s Groupement Astronautique Français (French Astronautic Group) and the United Kingdom’s British Interplanetary Society, selects the next destination for the IAC threeyears in advance. Israel first played host to the IAC in 1994, but a lot has changed in the past two decades as the country has expanded its research and development in space sciences. “The fact that this space convention was chosen to take place in Israel is a tribute to Israeli sciences leading and advancing in the field. Israel may only be 68 years of age but the country is in the front row for entrepreneurship and new developments internationally,” Israel’s Minister of Science, Technology, and Space Ofir Akunis said in a statement regarding IAC 2015.

The full version of this article, written by Boardroom editor Lane Nieset,  is available in the April/May issue of the magazine available here. This is part of Boardroom’s 
legacy series, where we take a deeper journalistic dive into how congresses can leave a lasting legacy in the cities or regions where they’re held… and beyond.